Ice sculptures among few Boston New Year’s Eve traditions continuing

With New Year’s Eve events mostly canceled in Boston due to the pandemic, the ice sculptures along Boston Harbor are one of the few New Year’s traditions that are still happening.Capacity limits in restaurants and a 10 p.m. curfew time combined with restrictions put in place to combat COVID-19 spread put a damper on plans to ring in the new year in public.Still, families came out Thursday to walk around the Seaport District on the final day of 2020.There were games near District Hall, an acrobat performing near the federal courthouse and 17 ice sculptures placed along the waterfront by the Boston Harbor Now group.”We’re working with each property that there’s safety protocols in place,” said Christian Merfeld, with Boston Harbor Now. “Again, on each one of the ice sculptures signage, there’s guidelines in terms of making sure people don’t come to places that have more than 25 people.”Normally, the ice sculptures would be lit up so people can view them late into the night.Organizers say, this year, most of the sculptures will be taken down shortly after it gets dark.The fireworks, parades and street parties organized as part of First Night have been canceled. Instead, organizers were offering performances for people to watch online.

With New Year’s Eve events mostly canceled in Boston over pandemic concerns, the ice sculptures along Boston Harbor are one of the few New Year’s traditions that are still happening.

Capacity limits in restaurants and a 10 p.m. curfew time combined with restrictions put in place to combat COVID-19 spread put a damper on plans to ring in the New Year in public.

Still, families came out Thursday to walk around the Seaport District on the final day of 2020.

This content is imported from Twitter.
You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

There were games near District Hall, an acrobat performing near the federal courthouse and 17 ice sculptures placed along the waterfront by the group Boston Harbor Now.

“We’re working with each property that there’s safety protocols in place,” Christian Merfeld with Boston Harbor Now said. “Again, on each one of the ice sculptures signage, there’s guidelines in terms of making sure people don’t come to places that have more than 25 people.”

Normally, the ice sculptures would be lit up so people can enjoy them late into the night.

Organizers say this year, most of the sculptures will be taken down shortly after it gets dark.

The fireworks, parades and street parties organized as part of First Night have been cancelled. Instead, organizers were offering performances for people to watch online.

.