Prisons, shelters included in next step of Massachusetts’ COVID-19 vaccine rollout

Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker on Wednesday announced the state is nearly ready to begin administering COVID-19 vaccinations in congregate care settings, such as prisons and shelters.”These facilities are prioritized because they serve vulnerable populations in densely populated settings, which means they’re at significant risk for contracting COVID-19,” Baker said.Vaccinations for the 94,000 people included in this step of the distribution plan will begin Monday, the governor announced.”There are about 6,500 inmates and 4,500 staff at DOC facilities and we expect inoculations there will take about three weeks,” Baker said. “For houses of correction that are run by the sheriffs, there will be a similar process with their medical providers administering vaccines there.”Health and Human Services Secretary Marylou Sudders said clinicians will be administering the vaccines in the state DOC facilities.”Inmates and staff will both be receiving the Moderna vaccine and, obviously, it is voluntary,” Sudders said.This represents the fourth step of Phase 1 of the state’s timeline for vaccine distribution. Subsequent steps in this phase, which is scheduled to be completed in February, include home-based health care workers and health care workers who don’t treat COVID-19 patients.The second phase — which includes residents over age 75 and many essential workers — is expected to occur between February and April. The timeline predicts that vaccinations will become available to the general public between April and June.Baker on Tuesday announced that the state had reached an agreement to create the state’s first mass vaccination site at Gillette Stadium.

Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker on Wednesday announced the state is nearly ready to begin administering COVID-19 vaccinations in congregate care settings, such as prisons and shelters.

“These facilities are prioritized because they serve vulnerable populations in densely populated settings, which means they’re at significant risk for contracting COVID-19,” Baker said.

Vaccinations for the 94,000 people included in this step of the distribution plan will begin Monday, the governor announced.

“There are about 6,500 inmates and 4,500 staff at DOC facilities and we expect inoculations there will take about three weeks,” Baker said. “For houses of correction that are run by the sheriffs, there will be a similar process with their medical providers administering vaccines there.”

Health and Human Services Secretary Marylou Sudders said clinicians will be administering the vaccines in the state DOC facilities.

“Inmates and staff will both be receiving the Moderna vaccine and, obviously, it is voluntary,” Sudders said.

This represents the fourth step of Phase 1 of the state’s timeline for vaccine distribution. Subsequent steps in this phase, which is scheduled to be completed in February, include home-based health care workers and health care workers who don’t treat COVID-19 patients.

The second phase — which includes residents over age 75 and many essential workers — is expected to occur between February and April. The timeline predicts that vaccinations will become available to the general public between April and June.

Baker on Tuesday announced that the state had reached an agreement to create the state’s first mass vaccination site at Gillette Stadium.

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